Does my Law Firm Need a Brochure?

Even in an age of digital dominance, most professional service providers still commonly have in-person meetings with prospects, clients, and referral sources to discuss how we can help – and of course we want to leave a good impression. Brochures help when speaking with a potential client, reiterating the highlights of your presentation or pitch. Brochures keep your law firm “present” even after you leave a meeting, which is generally when the hiring decision is made.

If a prospect or a client asks for material about your law firm, you need to have a brochure – even if they may not read it. Why? Because not having a brochure sends a message, having a cheap, flimsy brochure sends a message, and having multiple sleek print collateral options available to choose from also sends a message. A law firm brochure is part of an effective brand identity and legal marketing infrastructure. While some people believe print materials get tossed into the trash, brochures do add value to a law firm marketing plan when used correctly.

USING YOUR LAW FIRM BROCHURE

My background is in personal injury and product liability, and to acquire cases for those practice areas law firms engage in a significant amount of demand generation. When a firm spends money on marketing and the resulting clients are often unsophisticated consumers, a brochure explaining the legal process can help educate the client and manage expectations.

Potential new clients will be extremely cautious about executing an agreement with an unknown commodity, especially when they find you online. That’s one of the reasons why, in order to succeed, every online company must have brochures and other forms of printed materials to hand out to clients and prospects. A print brochure gives you real life credibility, legitimizing your digital brand.

In addition to legitimizing your digital brand, you can use your law firm brochure in the following scenarios:

  1. Cross-Selling: In a firm with varied practice groups, cross-selling can enable attorneys to further monetize an existing client. Brochures help with the cross-selling of legal services, educating clients on additional areas of law. If you want to learn more about cross-selling, read Larry Bodine’s excellent blog post on the topic.
  2. Direct Mail: Your brochure can be its own direct mail piece or serve as part of a larger direct mail package. Great direct mail is more than a letter and a brochure – so think carefully about how to make what you send stand out.
  3. Event Follow-up: If your law firm follows my recommendation and throws an event, you will need a plan in place to execute a follow-up sequence. If your event is a success, failing to follow up can crush your return on investment (in a bad way). Use a law firm brochure as part of your event follow-up strategy.
  4. Electronic: When you design your law firm brochure, it will be created in digital form. Thus, you can and should use electronic PDF brochures to give your brochure some legs – allowing it to travel not only by hand delivery or by mail, but also over the digital airwaves.
  5. Leave-Behinds: You can leave your brochure behind after meeting a potential client or referral source or after a presentation, speech, or panel discussion. Make sure the topics covered support what you have just presented.
  6. Point of Sale: A prospect coming to visit your office may pick up something to read in your reception area – why not have a brochure touting your law firm’s accomplishments available to them while they are waiting?
  7. Respond to Inquiries: If you spend money on digital marketing, television advertising, or other form of lead generation, inbound communicators will ask about a specific product. In response, you drop a brochure in the mail, or send the digital version via email, to follow up.

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